I can’t be the only blogger who fails to deliver on their promises….

I’m really disappointing myself more than I’m failing any of my readers (although I’m sure I’m doing that, too) when I say “I’ll write more soon.”

I really do love to write, especially about planning and sustainability, but finding the time to research and write is a bit more challenging…as you’re read my say in the past…sorry.

Until I can find more time, I recommend interested readers take a look at my facebook page, Charm City EcoVillage. You won’t find original work, or many opinion pieces (like you would find here), but you’ll get updates on some of the more innovative sustainability-related programs and models in society, architecture, planning, and urban design — like this article by Anthony Flint in CityLab about Regenerative Design.

(Hope to) be in touch soon!

-Sustainable Meg

Baltimore Riots … Blame the Urban Planner?

Blame the Urban Planner

With my City in turmoil, I’ve been asking myself about the role of society, citizens, and my profession in contributing to, and then resolving, conflicts like this.

As a practicing Urban Planner who is relatively “fresh” out of grad school (one year, now), I have found myself wondering these past weeks (well, to be honest, my whole life, but especially in these last few weeks) what society must do to remedy tragic and unequal conditions in urban neighborhoods. As a minority majority member in a City whose population is 63% African American/Black, it becomes an issue about race whether you want it to or not (I know, we thought racial inequality ended decades ago…well it very certainly did not).

Being connected to many white people through facebook, posts this past week have created deep chasms between polar opposite viewpoints.

This presentation, which I gave yesterday morning to the Planning and Urban Design team at my office, talks about how structural racism has contributed to a cyclical and viscous inequality among Baltimore’s residents.

Despite its name, the presentation is not so much an attack on Urban Planners, but a criticism of society and urban policy as contributors to urban inequality and the resulting violence. However, the presentation is intended to be a call for action for urban planners and designers, and citizens alike.

Megan_May2015_TeamResearch_lores links